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Rising Up: Hale Woodruff's Murals from Talladega College at WSE Galleries - Steinhardt School of Cul
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Rising Up: Hale Woodruff's Murals at Talladega College WSE Galleries - Steinhardt School of Culture July 30, to October 13, FREE - Tue. through Sat. 10:30am - 6:00pm. These exceptional paintings have just been restored and are on a one-time national tour before returning to their permanent home in Alabama. This is the only time these masterpieces will be available for viewing in the New York metropolitan area.

7/30/2013 to 10/13/2013
When: 7/30/2013
10:30 AM
Where: WSE Galleries
Steinhardt School of Culture
80 Washington Square East
New York, NY  10003
Contact: Luther Garrison
917-557-7063
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Rising Up: Hale Woodruff's Murals from Talladega College at WSE Galleries - Steinhardt School of Culture
http://steinhardt.nyu.edu/m/80wse/
July 30, to October 13, FREE
Tuesday through Saturday 10:30am - 6:00pm.

These exceptional paintings have just been restored and are on a one-time national tour before returning to their permanent home in Alabama. This is the only time these masterpieces will be available for viewing in the New York metropolitan area. In 1938, Talladega College President Buell Gallagher commissioned Hale Woodruff to paint a series of six murals portraying noteworthy events that commemorated the transition from slavery to freedom to be displayed in the new Savery Library, then under construction. The first three murals were installed in 1939 and were focused on the 1839 slave uprising that took place on the ship Amistad. Painted on the centennial anniversary of this historic event and depicting scenes of the mutiny, the trial, and the return of the captives to Africa, this remarkable mural series was the first created of the Amistad story in the twentieth century. Talladega’s murals immediately attracted national attention, with cultural leaders in the African American community, in particular, championing the Amistad murals as a statement of pride and hope for racial equality. Today the murals remain relevant symbols of the centuries-long struggle for civil rights. For further information: Luther Garrison, vurziel1@gmail.com, 917-557-7063 Leroy Fraiser, chubblee@aol.com

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